CARING FOR A BROODY MAMA HEN

Last Monday I was lucky enough to catch one of my hens brooding on a nest. It became apparent that she in fact had no eggs under her, but broody just the same. So I quickly whipped her up a little brooding box and stuck it in our old static coop.


Sure enough I moved her right into it and onto 9 mixed breed eggs.

Let me just preface this all by saying, I have no clue what I am doing…

Seriously, never done this before and I was a little freaked.

Who knows if those eggs were fertile? Not me…

But I did it anyway and there she was hours later still on the nest. Lady farmer for the win! I was so excited, jumping up for joy that I could not contain myself until a sudden wave of anxiety hit… What do I do for the next 21 days???

Well here we are folks, day 12 and still truckin’!

Margox (sillent x) is still sitting, we’re down one egg, and up one giant chicken squat (colossal egg hatching poops). Just yesterday she had her first romp about the coop. Which by the way scared the utter bejesus out of me. 

Basically all there is to do at this point, which I have found from my research, is wait the 21 days…. Maintaining clean water and keeping some food available. 

And of course I checked daily for chicken squats, because what mama wants to sit on her own poop??

Update:


What’s that I see? Looks like Margox’s a mama hen for real now!

Here we are post hatch! Seven healthy babies made it after a forced hatch on the last one after mama left the nest, after a little coaxing she went back and the little dude made it. 

What now you ask? Permaculture… 

Let mama do her job, so you don’t have to!

After a couple weeks I moved them in with the big flock, ever showing what a great mama they had by her protection. 

There ya go. Looking back I don’t know why I was so worried, these animals know what they’re doing better than me! 

And sometimes that’s just farm life. 

Peace and Love, 

Quincy 

3 thoughts on “CARING FOR A BROODY MAMA HEN”

  1. Congratulations! We just had our first chicks hatch a month ago. None of the eggs were hers. We got some eggs from a neighbor that has a rooster. I worried for the safety of the little ones but mamma really knows how to defend her babies.

    1. Thanks! I’m such a proud chicken mama this summer, I thought it would be sooo hard, but I’m learning more and more that Mother Nature knows what she’s doing and we just have to trust a little more. Personally I think my chicks are so much happier growing up with a mama of their own species.

      1. The chicks are all in the same spsies, they are all varieties of the human-breeding efforts.
        To be a different species is impossible. Mutations do not change species, they are simply different varieties of chickens.
        Thanks for your time and post.

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