Simply Delicious Homemade Pesto.

Hi y’all! If you love pesto you’ll love this recipe, if you also love preserving your herb harvest this post is for you.

Before this summer I never how simple and fun making homemade pesto was. Even better if you have your own right outside your back door, am I right?

All you need is a food processor/blender and cute jar to stuff it in and you’re set.

Ingredients:

  • 3 C fresh basil leaves (packed)
  • 1/4 C pine nuts
  • 1/2 C organic olive oil
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 2 tsp lemon juice (fresh squeezed)
  • 2 cloves garlic (minced)
  • 1/3 C grated Parmesan (fresh if possible)

Directions:

  1. Clean off any bugs or dirt from basil and rinse under water if needed (pat dry)
  2. Add basil leaves, pine nuts, lemon zest & juice, garlic, and Parmesan cheese to food processor and blend until well incorporated.
  3. Drizzle in oil and let emulsify and blend in well.
  4. Voila! Pack your yummy pesto into a jar and store in your fridge.

Make this pesto with any and all varieties of basil you choose. So far I’ve done sweet, Thai, and cinnamon… lime and purple are next up. I even started more seeds and took a few cuttings for indoor winter basil. Add it pizza, pasta, toast or anything your heart desires.

Cheers y’all!

Peace and Love,

Q

8 Free Seed-Starters

There’s no need to go break the bank on fancy seed trays. Up-cycle any of these for a quick and easy (and free) solution. Eventually I plan on buying a couple soil blockers in order to cut down on our waste and use of plastic, but until I can invest in that tool this is what we did this year. Check it out. 

  1. Milk cartons– these were empty epsom salt cartons we just cut the top off and filled with soil. 
  2. Toilet paper rolls– we save all our rolls for crafts or firestartes, and now see starters. Works great for peas since you can fill halfway and back fill as the sprouts grown taller. 
  3. Shallow boxes– this was my mother’s experiment and it worked amazing for sunflowers, and that’s just mulch from the chicken yard. 
  4. Shipping materials– fill with soil and plant. Boom. 
  5. Juice bottles– all did was cut off the top and added two drain holes. 
  6. Egg cartons— ever tried planting tomatoes in egg shells?And here’s a couple more options that I didn’t have the chance to try, though I have seen other folks find great success with also 
  7. Milk jugs– simply cut the jug in half and discard top half, poke some drain holes in the bottom and voila! 
  8. Coffee cans– coffee cans are great since they hold warmth quite well and can be reused many times. All you you need to do is take a hammer and a nail and add a few drain holes in the bottom. For an added effect only fill halfway with soil and cover it with plastic to retain temperature, sorta like a greenhouse.
  • One a side note: instead of buying more greenhouse seed trays I also started a great deal of our garden in paper cups and solo cups that we had lying around the house, saved a lot of money doing that folks!

As you can see, there’s no need to spend countless dollars year after year on expensive to buy cheaply made plastic seed trays. This is more sustainable and much more financially forgiving. Not to mention you will be cutting down on your household waste and reusing those paper/plastic/metal products. Most of the paper based ones can also be planted directly into the ground. Give it a try, what can you lose? And just keep planting seeds y’all!

Okra in the sunset.

Peace and Love

Q

    What To Do When Your Dogs Get Skunked! 

    Might I take this chance to introduce you to a few of my fur babies…?

    This is Dixie Mae, culprit of the stink numbero uno. 

    She was skunked about a month, being her (our) first time we had no idea what that burning hair/plastic smell was. No joking, Spencer and I searched for the ‘electrical fire’ source for about two hours before deeming ourselves insane. 


    By routine the next morning Spencer gave Dixie her goodbye kisses before leaving for work, only to find out his face and beard would then be smelling of skunk for the days entirety… and then some.. 

    So yes, she stank up the house for a good 8 hours before we noticed… ufda. 

    Next on the rap sheet Mr. Kato… he was the antagonist of the satire which was the other night… he was so close to the skunk that half his face was yellow…. sigh. Save to say the swear words were a flyin’ around the middle of that night. 

    His side kick? That ever dependable and trouble-making sister Brodee Sue.


    So what do you do in these most stinky of circumstances?

    Take a deep breath (since you’ll not want to for three months) and try to laugh about it. Dogs will be dogs and skunks will happen from time to time. Like Forrest Gump said, “sh*t happens… sometimes…”

    In the one month since we moved all (three) of our dogs have been sprayed by a skunk. So you could say I’ve had some time to experiment with how to keep the smell at bay. 

    To keep things easiest I won’t talk about what didn’t work… (tomato juice/sauce bath) ahem….

    But what has WORKED for us:

    – Bath your dog (and yourself) in Dawn dish soap… since you’ll likely end up in the shower and wet anyway. Trust me the smell passes from family member to family with haste. 

    – After the shower wipe down your fur baby with a rag dampened with hydrogen peroxide. Let dry. 

    – Wipe down a second time with an apple cider vinegar dampened rag. Let dry.  

    – Keep diluted spray bottle (ACV + water) on hand for intermittently spritsing your dog and whatever bedding they’re using. We went so far as to spray this in the air once a day when the smell would come back up. 

    – Diffuse CPTG essential oils FOREVER — as you already should be ;)!!! Since we only have one diffuser I let my tea kettle steam with OnGuard EO on board. In the meantime I’ve had an assortment of Lemon, Lemongrass, Wild Orange, Lavendar, OnGuard, Grapefruit and Cedarwood hard at work, and boy does it take that stench away. 

    • Don’t have essential oils?? Visit my online store —-> HERE!

    – Double wash any garment/linen that has come into contact with said stinky pup. I usually use an environmentally friendly detergent but we went full out on Arm & Hammer with OxyClean. 

    Unfortunately there is no immediate quick fix to get rid of the smell completely. It’s all you can do to keep it at bay. The spray from the skunk attaches to hair follicles and gets into skin pores, worst part? It will not be totally gone for up to 3 months. So you’re in for the long haul folks. 

    Ok so not all of these are the most natural of remedies. But let’s just say being pregnant with three skunked out dogs has been no cup of tea.. But if these worked for me I’m sure they can help you to. 

    Anyone else’s dog ever been skunked? I would love to hear what y’all did to beat the stink. 

    Peace and Love,

    Q